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For lordhaternumber1superstar and graphitetroll: I don’t know too much about chemistry, but I can tell you that Coke probably tastes different in a glass bottle vs an aluminum can is because of the reaction of the aluminum molecules with the multisyllabic compounds within the coke. I assume that the Al, having extra electrons to give away (a +3 element), likes to interact and probably form or break bonds within the compounds, altering the taste. Glass doesn’t interact with anything, so yeah. Differences between Coke in a glass and Coke in a can.

I could be making this up, but it sounds plausible to me.

And if you’re wondering why Coca Cola tastes different from other countries, that’s because the formula is slightly different. Like, using real sugar in Mexican Coca-Cola and whatnot.